Monday, June 9, 2014

Kickstarter relaxes crowdfunding project rules

Crowdfunding site Kickstarter has relaxed its rules about which projects can be placed on its site.

By Leo Kelion Technology desk editor for BBC

Owlet Care's smart sock for babies was rejected by Kickstarter
Owlet Care smart sock
Indiegogo
Indiegogo allowed cosmetics start-ups on its site when they were banned on Kickstarter 
However, weapons, drugs, pornography and political fundraising remain prohibited.The change ends outright bans on cosmetics, eyewear, electronic surveillance equipment and all health, medical and safety products.
The New York-based firm said it wanted to "simplify" its rules. The move may also help it compete against rivals.
Alternatives, including Indiegogo and UK-based GoGetFunding, ban illegal and deliberately misleading projects, but otherwise take a more relaxed policy.
"Indiegogo's 'open-door' policy does have some drawbacks but it has proved that crowdfunding has much wider applications than the rather narrow rules which Kickstarter has had until now," said Barry James, founder of the UK-based Crowdfunding Centre advisory service.
"It's also shown that it's open-by-default nature helps enormously in the evaluation of projects and the early detection of any attempted fraud."
However, Nesta - an innovation-focused charity that has researched the crowdfunding industry - warned that the move carried risks.
"Kickstarter has had a reputation for being one of the more difficult platforms to get on, and I think the effect will be bad news for its rivals in the short term as it starts picking up the sort of projects it rejected in the past," its senior researcher Liam Colllins said.
"But I'd expect this to lead to an increased failed-project rate and potentially more issues with late delivery of rewards.
"The question is whether its brand is strong enough so that it can afford this and still enjoy market dominance."
Software check
Kickstarter has attracted more than $1bn of pledges since it began operations in 2009.
Members of the public only hand over cash if a project hits its funding target. They do not get a stake in the business but may qualify for a reward, such as an early release of a product seeking cash.
The site makes money by taking a 5% cut of the total amount raised and also charges a payment processing fee.
Its chief executive Yancey Strickler blogged that the new rules are based on three principles that projects should abide by:
  • They must create something that can be shared with others
  • They must be honest and clearly presented
  • They cannot raise funds for charity, offer financial incentives or include any of the items on the slimmed-down "prohibited" list
In addition the firm is now offering creators the ability to launch their projects without having them approved by a member of Kickstarter's staff.
Instead the client can request that a software-based check is carried out to speed up this process.
This involves an algorithm checking that the rewards, funding goal and other information comply with the site's rules.
Mr Strickler noted that this option was only being made available to about 60% of projects now, but he intended to widen it to others soon.
He added that some clients might still prefer to speak to a community manager for tips on how to maximise their chance of success.
Rejected smart sock
One example of a product previously rejected by Kickstarter but accepted elsewhere is a smart sock for babies. The site rejected Owlet Care's device - which promises to transmit data about an infant's heart rate, skin temperature and position to an associated app - in 2012.
The start-up eventually raised more than $140,000 (£83,560) via a campaign using Selfstarter's crowdfunding platform before going on to obtain a further $1.85m from private investors.
Kickstarter stressed that its change in policy would not, however, be a free-for-all when it came to health-related tech.
"The new way to look at it is not about medicine/health/safety," spokesman Justin Kazmark said.
"But it's specifically [a ban on] any item claiming to cure, treat, or prevent an illness or condition - whether via a device, app, book, nutritional supplement or other means."

Friday, February 7, 2014

Woody Harrelson aims to replace paper with a $5,000,000 crowd fund

By James de Rin - Crowd Source Capital © – February10th 2014
















Meet Matthew McGrath the dynamic CEO of Canadian based Optimize Capital Markets, a new equity crowd funding platform for projects, looking for a capital requirement from $3 - $5 million. With a drill down background in high net worth & private wealth management from his years at Bank of Canada his vision is to build over the next 3 years, the leading “equity crowd funding platform” on Canadian soil.

With the help of due diligence, and proven business models his pre-selected projects for funding are not pipedreams, pre-orders or legal begging.  For your minimum investment of $25,000 and in this particular instance aimed mainly at institutional investors you will receive stock in the company for a minimum investment of $250,000.

While Kickstarter and Indiegogo have conquered the rewards space of crowd funding, the equity crowd funding space is still up for grabs! There is a global race on to conquer “the financial disruption” of raising money for companies, through crowd funding in return for stock. Crowdcube has done well in the UK using a membership loop-hole for equity ownership through a crowd fund. 

But in the US and Canada, crowd funding markets dwarf the UK. There they have paved the way for the culture of crowd funding which is success centric for your idea or project!
One such project that went live on December 11th 2013 on OCM’s platform was Prairie Paper Ventures, Inc. It comes with good credentials, a Hollywood star, who has put his money where his mouth is. One, Woody Harrelson who is currently on HBO in True Detective and recently on our cinema screens in Hunger Games: Catching fire and in edgy films like Rampart. What you might not know about him is that he is an advocate for the environment. Not only is he a vegan but he is passionate about recycling and saving the planet. So much so that he started a company to do just that. After 15 years in business and now in profit, PPV Inc is looking for expansion capital.

OCM’s platform is looking to raise $5,000,000 for a 20% equity stake which values the company at $25,000,000.

Is it profitable and how did OCM get involved?  


Well with a presentation by Woody Harrelson, Jeff Golfman (see picture) a leading eco titan and Clayton Manness, a former provincial Minister of Finance for Canada to lend credibility and after careful due diligence by Matthew McGrath’s team they agreed that with PPV Inc’s track record, expansion capital was a good investment for the platform.  It’s only early days, but the response is positive. With contracts in place with companies like Staples and Unisource and a product made from waste straw into paper they are on track to raise their required capital. 

It’s ironic! On December 11th 2013, the LA Times had an Op Ed by Nicholas A. Basbanes on the paperless society how we were supposed to not use paper anymore...Yet as the LA Times said there are 20,000 identifiable uses of paper and International Paper has just increased their sales by $1.8 Billion to $27.8 Billion for 2012. The average American uses more than 748 pounds of paper a year.

What does Prairie Paper Ventures Inc do?

A private company based in Winnipeg and in business for 15 years. It makes paper from wheat straw 80% and 20% from recycled wood fiber. The paper's brand name is Step Forward Paper. It is produced in India because there is no eco mill in North America and Europe available. So PPV outsources production and acts as a distribution company for now. The business plan is to build a 100% tree free mill on the Prairies which will be eco friendly, without chlorine and eco friendly taking advantage of farm waste's millions of tonnes of wheat straw.

So with a timely launch and a disruptive business model Matthew McGrath aims to raise $5,000,000 from a minimum of 20 high net individuals. It’s an exciting time for raising finance through the crowd. 














Thursday, February 6, 2014

RealtyShares Enables Crowdfunded Property Investment With Bitcoin


 (@dannybradbury) | Published on February 4, 2014 at 19:52 GMT | InvestorsLifestyle,News


Crowdfunding real estate venture RealtyShares is now taking bitcoin-based investments.
The site, founded in June last year, enables small investors to get into real estate by pooling their money with others. The crowdfunding investments include family homes, commercial properties, and apartment complexes.
Each property is purchased under a separate limited company (LLC), and investors in the property are given a share of the rent on a monthly or quarterly basis, based on their investment. When the property is sold, they are also awarded a share of that profit.

CEO Nav Athwal said that the decision to take investments in bitcoin was driven by a significant base of non-domestic investors. 10-15% of the people investing in US property through RealtyShares are from outside the country.
The company signed with Coinbase as its payment processor, and integrated with its API. “Some international investors specifically asked for the feature,” Athwal said.
RealtyShares is treating the bitcoin investments as pure currency, and will not be holding a position in bitcoin. As it does with Overstock, Coinbase will immediately convert incoming bitcoin payments to fiat currency based on the current market exchange rate.
For the first million dollars in bitcoin-based investments, Coinbase is providing its conversion service for free. After that, it will charge a 1% conversion rate for all bitcoins sent to RealtyShares.
When transaction fees are charged, the crowdfunding real estate investment site will swallow the transaction fee itself, although depending on volume, it may reconsider that in the future, Athwal said.
There is no secondary market for shares, and investors are committed to a contract for at least six months, and up to seven years.
Returns on property investments will vary according to a number of parameters, including the type of property, and the type of investment. One option is to be a direct owner of a property, for which Athwal forecasts (but doesn’t guarantee) returns of 8-9% annually.
The other option is to take a debt position, in which you invest in the LLC rather than the property directly. The LLC then takes a mortgage or promissory note, which reduces the investor’s risk, as they are investing in the company rather than directly in the asset, Athwal said.
“We’re the first platform that lets you use bitcoin to invest in something other than bitcoin,” concluded Athwal. “Bitcoin is generally treated as an asset as opposed to a currency. We enable investors and BTC holders to put it into something tangible like real estate.”

Monday, December 9, 2013

The Next Big Thing: Where Crowdfunding and Investing Meet

written by Northwestern Mutual Voice - Forbes












It's what many investors dream about: getting in at the ground floor of the next Apple or Facebook. Thanks to the 2012 Jumpstart Our Business Startups (JOBS) Act and a recent decision by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), some investors may be one step closer to uncovering such an opportunity through a new type of investing called equity-based crowd funding.
Crowd funding is part of a worldwide phenomenon that leverages the power of the Internet to pool the resources of people (the “crowd”) in support of a project. “There are two main models for crowd funding: donation- and equity-based,” said John Mroz, Investment Consultant for Northwestern Mutual Wealth Management Company. “Donation-based crowd funding (think websites like KickStarter and IndieGogo) is when people donate funds in exchange for tangible, non-monetary rewards, such as a copy of the company’s computer game or the promise of a future service or perk when the project is completed. In contrast, equity-based crowd funding is where investors contribute early-stage funding to a company in exchange for an equity stake in the business.”
Donation-based crowd funding has seen tremendous growth in the last few years. In fact, industry insider Massolution reported that crowd funding volumes are estimated to reach $5.1 billion in 2013, an increase of 89 percent from 2012. Many expect equity-based crowd funding also to take off.
Equity-based crowd funding took form with the 2012 passage of the JOBS Act, which expanded the ability of non accredited individuals to make direct investments in private companies at the earliest stage of their development through registered web-based portals. Up until this point, the only way to invest in these businesses was through a private equity group, an “angel” investor, or at the initial public offering (IPO) stage. However, before investors can access these web-based portals, the Securities and Exchange Commission still needs to approve final rules governing the operation of this newest capital market. Those rules are expected sometime in 2014.
A level of investor protection

As the proposed SEC rules stand now, entrepreneurs would be allowed to raise up to $1 million in a 12-month period either using a licensed broker-dealer or via a funding portal registered with the SEC. Investors with an annual net income or net worth of less than $100,000 would be allowed to invest up to 5 percent of that or $2,000, whichever is more, every 12 months. Investors with an annual income or net worth greater than $100,000 would be able to invest up to 10 percent of that every 12 months. Securities bought through crowd funding portals would have to be held at least a year before being sold.
Companies would be required to provide detailed information to investors so that they understand what they’re getting into; however, only those raising more than $500,000 would have to file more detailed information with the SEC. Even so, equity crowd funding isn’t without significant risks, including the chance that you could lose all or part of your investment.
Risks and barriers to success

“Equity-based crowd funding can offer investors the chance to own a piece of a fledgling company, but they’re often risky bets and can be more volatile than more established stocks because of how unproven these start ups tend to be,” said Mroz. “If the business succeeds, then its value goes up—and so does the value of that share of the business. But the converse also can be true. That’s why due diligence is key for investors.”
For many entrepreneurs, it can be easier to raise money for a project than it may be to make that project a success. Investors who are sold on a good idea but have no experience working with start ups could easily overlook a weak financial statement or a questionable business model.
“There are lots of examples of individuals who donated money to start ups that never managed to make the leap from concept to actual product,” concluded Mroz. “But even if the company had early success, investors may be surprised to find their original equity stake was diluted as more funding was required to take the business to the next level. What’s important to remember is that just a small number of these startups will be winners, leaving most investors holding stakes in companies that may end up having little or no value.”
For these and other reasons, Mroz suggests speaking with a professional advisor about equity crowd funding and its possible role as a speculative add-on to a sound financial plan. Specifically, he or she can explain prudent ways to invest in the broad opportunities this new and still untested investment opportunity may provide.
The Northwestern Mutual Voice Team is a group of professionals who share insights and opinions from experts and industry leaders across the enterprise. Our vision is to inspire others to take action and plan for their financial future through topics ranging from financial planning, retirement planning and distribution strategies, wealth accumulation and preservation, to leadership, philanthropy and innovation. 
To Learn More click Here

Sunday, December 8, 2013

Why Crowd Funding Rocks

By Hanaan Rosenthal Author, Founder and President of Custom Flow Solutions

There's no doubt that the Internet has changed the way we do many things. I cannot remember, for instance, the last time I visited my bank teller, bought a postage stamp or walked into a book store. While the use of the Internet has some unsavory social implications, such as IAD (Internet Addiction Disorder) to name one, it also has aspects that will forever displace the balance of power from a few at the top calling the shots, to the rest of us determining our own path.

Displacement The first such phenomenon in my mind, was YouTube. Before YouTube became popular, you were a star when Nickelodeon or Disney told you you were. Someone in those corporations would scout talent, made them up and then made them famous. Now take Fred , for example. He put some crazy-funny home-made videos up, and people liked him. He now has over a billion views and over 2 million subscribers. No one at Disney told him what to say or what to wear. Or Jenna Marbles, the hilarious inappropriate blond hottie, who's now sporting over 11 million subscribers and over 1.27 billion views. I dare Nickelodeon to sensor her rants. The web, in these cases, is all about displacement. Letting you and I decide what goes and what doesn't rather than having some suit decide for us. Amazon.com is another great equalizer -- not so much for book stores, but very much for authors. Anyone can write and publish book and get a chance to sell it along side the best sellers. I like that! Getting funded The next such form of displacement is another example of how the masses can grab control previously held by the wealthy few: Funding. Yes, rich people have more money, but take all us average Joes, and together we have a bundle.

And now, with crowdfunding, we can combine that money to decide what projects get funded. The traditional methods of funding meant that people with great ideas and creativity were actively looking for the few people with money to spare. Those few would then decide if we, the people, are or aren't interested in their idea. Crowdfunding skips that step altogether. Why ask one person what the rest of us want when you can just as the rest of us? With crowdfunding, anyone can invest as little as $1 in any project. Sometimes to buy advanced product, simply to be a part of the next big thing, or even buy shares of the company, as may be soon possible. The difference is that the company or individual that put the product together don't have to go begging. All they have to do is make a compelling video and convince you and I that helping them with $12 will be just too much fun to pass. 2013 is becoming a $5 Billion year for crowdfunding projects, up over 500 percent from 2010.

Next step When you have successful sites revolving around a new phenomenon, you start to see aggregator sites. While some of those are aimed towards the crowdfunders themselves, a new, unique site is emerging that aims to make projects across all crowdfunding sites more accessible to investors. By investors, of course, I mean you and I.

Meet dropkic.kr. A brilliantly designed new site that allows you to discover, rate and share crowdfunded project across all sites. Part of Betaspring, a startup incubator in Providence RI, dropkic.kr founders Matt and James have something really cool going on. I caught up with founders Matt, James and Olivia, their social media marketing coordinator, to get a better idea of what they are up to. Dropkic.kr

Q: What is dropkic.kr?

Matt: Since Kickstarter was kickstarted in 2009, literally hundreds of crowdfunding websites have sprouted up, releasing thousands of projects every day. Today, we - the backers - simply can't find the campaigns we care about, let alone keep up with them. Dropkic.kr is the new tool for project supporters. It pulls together the projects from all major crowd funding platforms. Whether you're a fashionista or a gadget enthusiast, dropkic.kr learns what you love, and recommends you the hot new projects you would never have found, as soon as they come out. For projects you've liked, it alerts you if you're about to miss an early bird discount or the closing date, so you don't end up kicking yourself once it's too late.

Q: How are you positioned relating to other sites?

Matt: There are a million and one tools and websites out there which help fundraisers get their campaign off the ground, but supporters are left to fend for themselves. We either have to trawl through projects across a dozen of our favourite sites every day, read an email on what the Kickstarter staff happen to like that week, or more often just miss out. We've been called 'the crowdfinding app' and 'the Kayak of Crowdfunding', but really our mission is to help crowdfunders find and back the projects they care about.

Q: What do you see the role of crowdfunding in the world economy?

Matt: Crowdfunding is a fundamentally new, more democratised flow of capital. $5 Billion this year will grow to more than $10 Billion next year. If you think this is a big deal, analysts estimate that crowdfunding will unlock as much as $1 Trillion in capital with the JOBS Act. The crowdfunding movement is enabling all of us to collaborate with a flood of inventors, creatives, entrepreneurs and altruists, to make their ideas a reality and the world that bit better. As a startup ourselves, we have seen so many world-changing projects fail because of a simple lack of capital. Making these new markets more efficient by bringing the right people together definitely gets us out of bed in the morning.

Q. Are you looking for funding yourselves?

Matt: Truth be told, if we were, we couldn't legally announce it right now. We'll be raising a seed round very soon though, and with the JOBS Act lifting the ban on public fundraising last September, everyone can now benefit from the same investments rich VCs have accessed for decades, through equity crowd funding sites.

Thursday, October 24, 2013

SEC Approves Crowdfunding Plan Allowing Internet Stock Sales

October 24, 2013  Bloomberg News
Start-ups and small businesses could sell ownership stakes in their companies by soliciting investors over the Internet under a proposal advanced by the Securities and Exchange Commission.
The plan would set rules for equity crowdfunding, which lawmakers said would spur growth by easing financing when they mandated it in the 2012 Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act. The rules, which the SEC voted 5-0 to release for public comment yesterday, may boost the nascent crowdfunding movement and help the agency through its backlog of regulations required by the JOBS Act and Dodd-Frank law.
Businesses and startups too small or risky to attract funding from banks or venture capitalists are expected to use equity crowdfunding. Regulators say they tried to address concerns that such fundraising will create a channel for fraud by allowing upstart companies to issue illiquid shares to retail investors.
“The proposal before us today appears to offer great promise for providing capital to small businesses so they can survive and hopefully thrive, but it may also provide great risks to investors,” Democratic SEC Commissioner Kara M. Stein said before the vote in Washington. “If we don’t get it right, I fear that the promise of crowdfunding will be lost.”

Advertising Allowed

The SEC’s proposal, open for public comment for 90 days, becomes the second regulation from the JOBS Act advanced under Chairman Mary Jo White. In July the agency approved a rule lifting the ban on advertising for investors outside of a public offering, which eased the ability to market directly to investors considered sophisticated and wealthy enough to understand the risks of investing and withstand a loss.
Crowdfunding has drawn wide interest because it will be open to any investor regardless of their income or net worth. Under the proposal, crowdfunding must be done online through an entity that provides investors with forums to ask questions and communicate about a deal.
“All investors, not just the so-called accredited investors, will have the opportunity to invest in entrepreneurs and their ideas at an earlier stage than ever before,” Republican SEC Commissioner Michael Piwowar said.
Businesses using crowdfunding could raise no more than $5,000 a year from someone whose income or net worth is less than $100,000. Investors with income or net worth greater than $100,000 could contribute as much as 10 percent of their annual income or net worth, to a maximum of $100,000 in one year.

No Verification

The proposal doesn’t require businesses or funding portals engaged in crowdfunding to verify compliance with those restrictions. Instead, a crowdfunding portal must ask investors to disclose their income or net worth as a means of determining compliance.
“It does make it easier for portals to operate with a large number of investors, which is within the spirit of the law,” said Rory Eakin, chief operating officer of CircleUp Network Inc.
The proposal creates a new regulatory regime for platforms such as CircleUp if they decide to engage in equity crowdfunding. The SEC estimates that 50 portals will initially participate in the market once the rules are adopted. Portals aren’t allowed to recommend deals or give investment advice.
Other portal operators that have shown interest in equity crowdfunding include Indiegogo Inc., EquityNet LLC, and RocketHub Inc. Kickstarter Inc., the most popular crowdfunding platform to date, has said it doesn’t intend to participate in equity crowdfunding.

Limits Imposed

A company using equity crowdfunding is limited to raising a maximum of $1 million per year. While companies raising smaller amounts would have to share financial statements and income-tax returns with investors, a business looking to raise more than $500,000 would have to provide audited financial statements. That requirement may deter some companies from participating in equity crowdfunding, Eakin said in a phone interview.
“It’s a very expensive process for early stage companies to spend $20,000 or $30,000 to have an audit,” Eakin said. “Venture firms historically don’t require those in Silicon Valley.”
Companies may intentionally limit their crowdfunding pitches to less than $500,000 to avoid having to hire an auditor, said Judd Hollas, chief executive of Fayetteville, Arkansas-based EquityNet.
“A formal audit is relatively rare and I’m a little bit surprised to see that is a requirement,” Hollas said.
To contact the reporter on this story: Dave Michaels in Washington at dmichaels5@bloomberg.net
To contact the editor responsible for this story: Maura Reynolds at mreynolds34@bloomberg.net

Thursday, October 17, 2013

SEC to Release Crowdfunding Rule Easing Investor Verification

October 17, 2013

Bloomberg News

Small businesses raising money by selling shares over the Internet wouldn’t have to verify that their backers comply with individual investment limits under a U.S. regulatory proposal set for a vote as soon as next week.
The plan, targeted for an Oct. 23 vote by the Securities and Exchange Commission, would allow such companies to use so-called equity crowdfunding without having to check that a person’s investment is a greater share of their income or net worth than allowed by law, according to two people with direct knowledge of the matter who asked not to be named because the proposal hasn’t been made public.
The crowdfunding rule, authorized as part of the 2012 Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act, is intended to benefit small businesses and startups too small to attract funding from banks or venture capitalists. It may also boost business for Internet funding portals such as Kickstarter Inc., IndieGoGo Inc., and CircleUp Network Inc. that are used by startups to raise money.
“Some of the verification requirements would effectively negate what Congress had in mind,” Harvey L. Pitt, a former SEC chairman and now chief executive officer of Kalorama Partners LLC, said in an interview. “It has to be done in a way that lets people raise money.”
Crowdfunding was a popular provision in the JOBS Act, with advocates saying it would unlock capital for small businesses and entrepreneurs. In implementing the law, the SEC has been trying to balance the need to protect ordinary investors from potential fraud with Congress’s goal of reducing regulations for small businesses.

Verification Impractical

The proposal, overdue by nine months, will become the second regulatory item from the JOBS Act advanced under SEC Chairman Mary Jo White. Although the law imposes limits on investors based on the person’s income or net worth, the people said the SEC’s proposal won’t require companies or brokers to verify compliance with the limit, something Internet funders have argued is impractical.
Under the law, businesses using crowdfunding could raise no more than $5,000 a year from someone whose net worth is less than $100,000. Investors with a net worth greater than $100,000 could contribute as much as 10 percent of their annual income or net worth, up to a maximum of $100,000 in one year.

1 Million Projects

Crowdfunding platforms raised $2.7 billion in 2012 and funded more than 1 million projects, according to research firm Massolution. Crowdfunding has financed technology projects such as the Pebble smartwatch, which raised more than $10 million on Kickstarter to develop a watch that works with an iPhone or Android-powered device.
Equity crowdfunding, which is practiced legally in the U.K. and Australia, accounts for less than 5 percent of the market, according to Ethan Mollick, a professor of management at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School of Business. Less than 1 percent of the money pledged through Kickstarter has gone to projects that may be fraudulent, according to Mollick, whose research has focused on the practice.
“What stops fraud is having a lot of eyeballs that look at a project,” Mollick said in a phone interview. “One thing I have advised both Kickstarter and lawmakers and policy makers to think about is you want what happens in crowdfunding to be as public as possible.”
To date, U.S. small businesses and nonprofits using Internet portals have offered perks or products in exchange for capital but so far haven’t been able to offer financial returns on equity.

Limits Imposed

Congress responded to such worries by putting restrictions on crowdfunding, including a $1 million limit on how much a company can raise in a year. Even small companies that use equity crowdfunding will have to, depending on their size, disclose their income-tax returns or financial statements and annual operating results.
“The commission is going to have to focus on enabling folks to raise funding easily and seamlessly, but at the same time the commission’s main preoccupation is investor protection,” Pitt said. “What they are worried about is trying to prevent swindle artists from getting their hands on public funding.”

Public Comment

If approved by the commission’s five members, the proposal will be open to public comment before the commission votes a second time on a final version.Once the SEC proposal is issued, the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority will propose detailed rules for funding portals that aren’t registered as brokerages.
The law “is very prescriptive about how crowdfunding needs to happen,” Thomas J. Kim, a former chief counsel in the SEC division writing the rule, said at an April conference sponsored by the Council of Institutional Investors. “It is not going to be as easy as going on the Internet to raise capital. It is going to be done in a highly regulated way.”
White took over the SEC in April saying she would push the agency to finish rules required under the JOBS Act. In July, the SEC finished the first rule authorized by the law, one that allows hedge funds, startups and other businesses to use advertising to raise money outside of a public offering.
Ending the ban on advertising opened the door to a more limited version of crowdfunding, allowing companies to pitch shares to accredited investors, or those considered wealthy enough to understand the risks of investing and withstand a loss.
To contact the reporter on this story: Dave Michaels in Washington at dmichaels5@bloomberg.net
To contact the editor responsible for this story: Maura Reynolds at mreynolds34@bloomberg.net