Wednesday, April 28, 2010

The Man behind crowdsourcing IBM's workforce

Who is Tim Ringo? What is his role at IBM?

RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, N.C. – So just who is Tim Ringo who made those comments about massive “crowdsourcing” and job reductions at IBM? What are his responsibilities within IBM?

Ringo is a vice president and Global Leader for IBM’s Human Capital Management consulting practice. According to IBM, he is based in London.

An author and thought leader within IBM, he is cited as a writer on several IBM reports related to work force and management issues.

Ringo also is listed as a speaker with the “Celebrity Speakers” Global Speakers Bureau in London.

His bio at the CS Web site says Ringo has “overall responsibility for more than 2000 HCM professionals around the world whose focus is helping clients enable enterprise innovation and performance through improved workforce effectiveness. His primary focus is to help clients create workforce and enterprise transformation through implementation of integrated human capital lifecycle strategy, processes and technologies. He is a sought-after expert on the topic of Human Capital Management and HR.”

Ringo joined IBM in 2006 after working at Accenture for 16 years.

The speakers bureau Web site says Ringo is “sought after in the media for expert opinion and interviews with organizations such as The New York Times , Wall Street Journal, Financial Times, The Spectator (Business). He is regularly booked as keynote speaker or panellist for Human Capital, HR and IT conferences around the world (China, US, India, Japan, Europe).”

Samples from two IBM reports

In a report titled “Focal jobs” released in November of which Ringo is listed as an author, IBM said:

“Increasingly, organizations are being asked to improve employee productivity while at the same time limiting discretionary spending on workforce investments. How can they accomplish both simultaneously? One approach is to channel time, energy and resources towards positions that make a clear and positive difference in an enterprise’s ability to succeed in the marketplace. By identifying these “focal jobs” – and the talent management practices that support them – organizations can pinpoint areas that require more attention, and more effectively allocate limited resources.”

Check out his video interview about the report at YouTube here.

In a 2008 report about “Transforming the workforce,” the writers that included Ringo advocated “A new form of organization.”

“The spotlight is once again being thrust upon the workforce. Major business publications and conferences are now placing issues such as talent management and employee engagement at the forefront of the corporate agenda. We believe this attention is long overdue. However, we do not believe that this focus on employees is merely another on the long list of corporate trends with a predictable shelf life. Instead, we see fundamental shifts in the way that organizations will operate in the future. These changes will require organizations to think about their employees, and how they contribute to business results, in new and different ways.”
To Learn More Click Here
Bookmark and Share

No comments:

Post a Comment